Shout out to Secretaries

Here’s a not so well-kept secret: secretaries make the world go ‘round. If you are a parent, volunteer, or partner with us you know that the secretary is often the first face you encounter upon entering a school building. The role of the secretary is key not only to the overall functioning of a school, but to the success of our community partnerships and volunteer efforts. To all administrative professionals sprinkled throughout the Kalamazoo Public Schools, thank you for all you do. You help us surround students with a community of support, empowering them to stay in school and achieve in life.

Given that Wednesday is Administrative Professionals Day in the United States, we thought we’d share what a few of our CIS staff have to say about their schools’ secretaries:

Angie Boyd and Karen Brooks provide me with prompt and accurate information whenever I need it, have a great sense of humor, communicate with me when they notice students in need of services, and always do what they can to support the services offered through Communities In Schools.

Laura Keiser, CIS Site Coordinator at King-Westwood Elementary

 

Our secretaries are amazing! Mrs. Zook and Mrs. Vandyke are thoroughly committed to our students and they take every opportunity to connect them to CIS and other resources. We couldn’t do it without them.

Emily Demorest, CIS After School Coordinator at Maple Street Magnet School for the Arts

 

Spring Valley’s secretary, Mrs. Prevo, is very supportive of CIS and we appreciate all of her assistance.

Martha Serio, CIS Site Coordinator & Jay Gross, CIS After School Coordinator at Spring Valley Center for Exploration

 

A special shout out to Gail Bunschoten:  Northglade Montessori Magnet Elementary has a very caring secretary. She delivers superior customer service and always has a smile on her face. She’s a fantastic caregiver for the students who visit! Thank you.

Brenda Johnson, AmeriCorps VISTA, on behalf of CIS Site Team at Northglade Montessori

 

Julie Davis is a lot of things to students, staff, and parents, at Arcadia. When it comes to CIS, she is there for whenever and whatever we need. When we seek her wisdom, she always offers her full attention. She provides proof-reading skills to notes we send home to parents. She is always helpful. We can’t help but leave her office laughing and feeling lighter. Thank you, Julie, for all things tangible as well as invisible that you provide!

Gulnar Husain, CIS Site Coordinator and Calli Carpenter, CIS After School Coordinator at Arcadia Elementary School

 

Pam Storher and Joy Vandepol are amazing at their jobs and all the in between. During our massive all-building move they were instrumental in keeping everyone on track with information that we needed to know. Once in the new building they worked hard to make students and parents feel welcomed and reassured about the changes. Pam and Joy are always willing to put their work on hold to hear what we need and are always on top of getting us the information quickly. Our day to day lives would not run as smoothly or efficiently without their help. We appreciate their tireless work to help our students, families and staff be successful!

Elisabeth Finch, CIS Site Coordinator and Deondra Ramsey, CIS After School Coordinator at Washington Writers’ Academy

 

A special shout out to Ann Campbell and Sheri Ferrari: Parkwood Upjohn Elementary has the best “Dynamic Duo” in the world. They demonstrate compassion and deliver superior customer service to everyone who comes through the front doors. They greet everyone with a warm smile and have a warm approach to whoever graces their presence. They always carry themselves in a professional way. Thank you both.

Brenda Johnson, AmeriCorps VISTA on behalf of Parkwood CIS Site Team

 

Mrs. Carol and Mrs. Peggy of Edison elementary

You know the names of 386 kids by face
teachers, staff, volunteers and all others who’ve tread
the path from silver door button to sign in sheet.
You answer an endless amount of questions with a smile.
Those you know not are looked into honestly
and you lend your aid without batting an eye.

Any parent or disgruntled child can be calmed,
any hungry late-comers fed from your secret goodie drawer,
any creature loved, even our therapy dogs,
any phone calls taken, made or transferred,
any accident or problem solved.

Mrs. Peggy, dear, you’ll be missed.
To stay, we wish you could be convinced.
From your colleagues and kids
we love you and will never forget you, even off the grid.
Our own Edison awesome, always remembered, our best.

To the two on the front lines—
both dearly beloved, one nearly retired—
thank you both for being amazing.
Shout out to you two, our favorite secretaries.
You both have caring hearts, positivity, and give of your time.
You’re both truly cherished and inspire our lives.

Nick Baxter, VISTA, took the sentiments of his CIS Site Team at Edison Environmental Science Academy Gerald Brown, CIS Site Coordinator & Stacy Salter, CIS After School Coordinator and wrote the above poem. 

KPS Secretaries Taray Stratton (left) and Barb Marsman (right)

These (photo above) are the secretaries that we adore at Woods Lake. We could never navigate a day without them. XXOO

Maureen Cartmill, CIS Site Coordinator and Donielle Hetrick, CIS After School Coordinator at Woods Lake Elementary: A Magnet Center for the Arts

 

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Pop Quiz: William Hawkins

KPS Principal William Hawkins with CIS Site Coordinator Martha Serio during the 2015 Unsung Heroes Awards.

Welcome back to the POP QUIZ! This is a regular, yet totally unexpected, feature where we ask students, parents, staff, our friends, and partners to answer a few questions about what they are learning, reading, and thinking about. Today we feature Mr. William Hawkins, who has been serving as principal at Spring Valley Center for Exploration for the past two years. Prior to this he was at Woods Lake for the past fifteen years, five as principal and the first ten as a teacher. What you may not know is that he comes from a long line of educators. He grew up in Flint where his mother was a principal. His grandmother was a teacher as was his great grandmother. His own mother encouraged him not to go into education! It was a hard job then and it is a hard job now. In this instance, our 12,000+ kids are fortunate that a young man didn’t listen to his mother! (Mr. Hawkins said his mom is now happy with his decision to enter education.)

We popped this quiz on Mr. Hawkins back in November, during the first snow day of the season.

Alright, Principal Hawkins: pencil out, eyes on your own paper. Good luck.

POP QUIZ

What is something interesting you’ve recently learned?  I’m always looking for facts. My wife tells me I should be on Jeopardy.  “How did you know that answer?” she’s always asking as we are watching the show. I do enjoy learning interesting facts and trivia. One day I might apply to appear on Jeopardy. I’d probably be in second place by the end of the show.

Tell us an interesting fact or piece of trivia. 

There is a new tree planted at the capital of Washington D.C. in honor of Emmitt Till.

What kind of tree is it? Do you know?

Sycamore.

What are you currently reading?

Currently I’m reading Charlotte Danielson’s Framework for Teaching Evaluation Instrument. It’s that time of year when I’m in classrooms doing evaluations. I want to make the process meaningful for teachers and myself. The Charlotte Danielson model helps with that. It is a collaborative structure where there’s both a pre-observation and post observation conference. The process is reflective for the teachers. It’s not just me going through classrooms with a checklist. It is a collaborative process; teachers have input. The tool is designed to create an environment where you reflect on your process, improve in areas of weakness and build upon your strengths.

Speaking of strengths, what is one of yours?

For me? Dealing with parents. Communicating with parents and students and being the link that connects parents to the school.

What do you want to be when you grow up?

Originally, I was going to be a professional football player and play for the Pittsburgh Steelers. They were my favorite team growing up. Lynn Swann, “Mean” Joe Greene….all the greats.

I’ll tell you a little bit of trivia about the Steelers. Did you know that they were the first NFL team to have a cheerleading squad?  

I didn’t know that. You need to be on Jeopardy.

I wouldn’t do well with geography questions. And I only know that bit of trivia because I lived in Pittsburgh for a time and one of my best friend’s mom—Norreen Modery—was a Pittsburgh Steelerette. So, back to you. What is your favorite word right now?

Achievement.

Tell us something more about you.

My experience in education—elementary all the way through high school –was a positive one. It is my goal to help the children that I serve have a positive learning experience as well. That is why I am in education. And being in the Kalamazoo Public Schools, the home of the Promise, there is an extra added incentive to make education an enjoyable experience for all students.

Behind every successful student is a caring adult. Who has been your caring adult?

First and foremost my family: my mother, father, and grandparents. And then there was my first grade teacher, Mrs. Hall. I remember we read the The Hobbit.

She read it to you?

No, we read it. “He can’t read that,” said a bookfair representative who was visiting the school. I read some of it to him and he was amazed. “I guess we have to get him the book, Lord of the Rings, now.” And he did.

That’s wonderful having caring adults encouraging you to really push yourself when it came to reading.

Yes. And then there was Mr. Alexander, my sixth grade teacher and the first male teacher I had. He motivated me, got the best out of me. High school was Mrs. Foster. She was my Spanish teacher and also the cadet teaching program teacher. This program gave me the opportunity to do a pre-teaching internship while I was still in high school. Mrs. Foster encouraged me to go further into education and encouraged me to minor in Spanish and it is because of her I am also certified to teach Spanish.

Thank you, Mr. Hawkins!

Mr. Hawkins is one of the people featured in the video that was created to celebrate the work of his CIS site coordinator, Martha Serio on her Unsung Hero Award. You can watch it here.

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Introduction to Mindfulness: How it helps students

Today’s guest blogger is Jessica Smith, Western Michigan University MSW Intern at Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. 

My name is Jessica Smith, I am an MSW (Masters of Social Work) intern at Parkwood-Upjohn Elementary through Communities In Schools of Kalamazoo. I graduated from Ferris State University in May 2014 with a Bachelor of Social Work and a Bachelor of Science in Technical and Professional Communication. I am pursuing my School of Social Work certificate and I will be graduating with my MSW in April 2016.

Since I began my internship with CIS, I was invited by Deb Faling of CIS to help run a mindfulness group at Woods Lake Elementary School, which hosts the after school program, Kids In Tune.

Prior to helping run the mindfulness groups, I was not aware of just how useful mindfulness can be in helping with concentration, focus, managing emotions and creating a more peaceful environment. I’ve practiced it myself and have noticed it has a positive effect on my thoughts and feelings.

What exactly is mindfulness and how does it help students?

Mindfulness is defined as, “maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment.” (Source: http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/topic/mindfulness/definition)

Many students in the mindfulness group have expressed positive feelings about the activity. Students have said they feel more “calm” and “relaxed” as a result of practicing mindful behaviors and mindfulness-oriented activities.

I’ve observed that students in the mindfulness group are indeed calmer, more aware of their feelings, their environment and demonstrate compassion towards themselves and others. They have demonstrated more patience and appear to be more “present” in the exact moment they are in.

I will be writing a series on mindful activities the students of the mindfulness group at Kids In Tune have been doing all year long:

Upcoming topics of mindful activities:

• Mindful breathing
• Mindful seeing
• Mindful hearing
• Mindful walking
• Mindful eating

My first post in the series will be about mindful breathing, which will be published in the upcoming weeks. Check out “Ask Me About My 12,000 Kids” for the latest on CIS news and events.

 

 

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Caring Adult: Olivia Gabor-Pierce

Nicholas Baxter, about to embark on his AmeriCorps VISTA journey with CIS, is seen here, taking his Oath of Service.

It’s time again to think back to when you were young and in school and recall that caring adult you felt especially connected to. Maybe it was in elementary school, or perhaps it was middle or high school. Who is that special person, who, even after all these years, you still carry within your hearts?

Members of the fabulous CIS team at Edison Environmental Science Academy have been taking up the challenge and sharing their caring adult. You’ve read about Principal Julie McDonald’s, CIS After School Coordinator Stacy Salters‘, and CIS Site Coordinator Gerald Brown’s caring adult. As I was preparing to run the post on AmeriCorps VISTA Nicholas Baxter’s caring adult, he informed me that he didn’t have a caring adult in his elementary or high school years and “so I chose the most attractive elementary teacher I had and although I do remember her being nice and, well, memorable she is not my most caring adult. I don’t recall anyone being a caring adult until college…”

So, here now is Nick’s reflection about his real caring adult…

At Western Michigan University I had a German professor named Olivia Gabor-Pierce. She was the first person I ever met who spoke four languages and wrote books. She was incredibly intelligent and challenged our intellects inside and outside of class. We thought critically about the language we were learning; she loved that.

Throughout my entire college career she was always the professor who was able to ground me in a few words. No matter what was going on or how stressful things were, her caring, open, and loving demeanor instantly calmed life around us. She was the first person who ever truly pushed my abilities beyond what I thought possible, she saw things in me I never was able to see.

She told me I must go to Bonn.  “You must go to Bonn,” she said. It became a meta mantra that was engrained in my subconscious until I actually did go and realized a whole new perspective on life. Because of her heart always being open to her students, my eyes were opened to the world and for that I thank her and believe she deserves the spot of my caring adult.

Nicholas A. Baxter, AmeriCorps VISTA

Nick leading students in a “Keep the Lights On After School” chant he wrote.

 

 

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Putting the Super in intendent, again.

Dr. Michael F. Rice, Superintendent of Kalamazoo Public Schools, speaking to crowd at CIS event

 

This title is resurrected from the post in which third grade students reflected on Dr. Michael F. Rice, Superintendent of Kalamazoo Public Schools. It was a really sweet post and you can read it here.

Some of the very best and talented superintendents throughout the nation (including right here in Kalamazoo!) incorporate Communities In Schools within their districts to  align community resources within the schools to increase our collective impact on children.

Three of those leaders recently spoke about how the CIS model has helped change the picture of education for students in their communities. Hailing from  Thomasville City Schools, North Carolina (Dr. Maria Pitre-Martin), Santa Fe Public Schools, New Mexico (Dr. Joel Boyd), and Richmond Public Schools, Viriginia (Dr. Jana Bedden), these  superintendents give a glimpse into what is going on beyond Kalamazoo. Watch this! It will take two minutes out of your day.

Worth your time, don’t you think?

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